angeles county – Orland CA http://orland-ca.com/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://orland-ca.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg angeles county – Orland CA http://orland-ca.com/ 32 32 Video: Dog rescued 1,800 feet from shore on California beach https://orland-ca.com/video-dog-rescued-1800-feet-from-shore-on-california-beach/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/video-dog-rescued-1800-feet-from-shore-on-california-beach/ Applause and cheers erupted as a dog was placed on the wet sand from a Californian beachvideo shows. A dog had just been rescued after being pulled nearly 2,000 feet from shore while swimming in a cove near a Los Angeles County state beach, lifeguards said. “Not your everyday sea rescue, but we were certainly […]]]>

Applause and cheers erupted as a dog was placed on the wet sand from a Californian beachvideo shows.

A dog had just been rescued after being pulled nearly 2,000 feet from shore while swimming in a cove near a Los Angeles County state beach, lifeguards said.

“Not your everyday sea rescue, but we were certainly happy to help this 4-legged friend back to the beach,” Los Angeles County Lifeguards tweeted Monday, Jan. 24. “Lifeguards launched a lifeboat from Zuma Beach after receiving a report of a dog swimming offshore.”

The brown dog was placed on a rescue sled and pulled approximately 1,800 feet to shore. A woman is heard screaming in delight as the dog returns to the beach, video shows.

The dog has found its masters. Rescuers did not say if the dog was injured.

“While rescues like this make us smile,” the lifeguards said, “rescuers would like to remind swimmers that dogs are not permitted on LA County beaches.”

dog rescue_fitted.png
A dog was pulled to shore after being washed up on a California beach, video shows. Screenshot of LACoLifeguards/@LACoLifeguards on Twitter

This story was originally published January 25, 2022 6:53 a.m.

Maddie Capron is a real-time McClatchy reporter specializing in the outdoors and wildlife in the western United States. She graduated from Ohio University and previously worked at CNN, the Idaho Statesman and the Ohio Center for Investigative Journalism.

]]>
Video: Rescued dog 1,800 feet from shore on California beach https://orland-ca.com/video-rescued-dog-1800-feet-from-shore-on-california-beach/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/video-rescued-dog-1800-feet-from-shore-on-california-beach/ Applause and cheers erupted as a dog was placed on the wet sand from a Californian beachvideo shows. A dog had just been rescued after being pulled nearly 2,000 feet from shore while swimming in a cove near a Los Angeles County state beach, lifeguards said. “Not your everyday sea rescue, but we were certainly […]]]>

Applause and cheers erupted as a dog was placed on the wet sand from a Californian beachvideo shows.

A dog had just been rescued after being pulled nearly 2,000 feet from shore while swimming in a cove near a Los Angeles County state beach, lifeguards said.

“Not your everyday sea rescue, but we were certainly happy to help this 4-legged friend back to the beach,” Los Angeles County Lifeguards tweeted Monday, Jan. 24. “Lifeguards launched a lifeboat from Zuma Beach after receiving a report of a dog swimming offshore.”

The brown dog was placed on a rescue sled and pulled approximately 1,800 feet to shore. A woman is heard screaming in delight as the dog returns to the beach, video shows.

The dog has found its masters. Rescuers did not say if the dog was injured.

“While rescues like this make us smile,” the lifeguards said, “rescuers would like to remind swimmers that dogs are not permitted on LA County beaches.”

dog rescue_fitted.png
A dog was pulled to shore after being washed up on a California beach, video shows. Screenshot of LACoLifeguards/@LACoLifeguards on Twitter

This story was originally published January 25, 2022 9:53 a.m.

Maddie Capron is a real-time McClatchy reporter specializing in the outdoors and wildlife in the western United States. She graduated from Ohio University and previously worked at CNN, the Idaho Statesman and the Ohio Center for Investigative Journalism.

]]>
Multi-Million Dollar California Beach Property Taken From Black Owners Allowed For Return | New https://orland-ca.com/multi-million-dollar-california-beach-property-taken-from-black-owners-allowed-for-return-new/ https://orland-ca.com/multi-million-dollar-california-beach-property-taken-from-black-owners-allowed-for-return-new/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 20:54:44 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/multi-million-dollar-california-beach-property-taken-from-black-owners-allowed-for-return-new/ Some of the prime beachfront real estate in Southern California can now be returned to the descendants of its rightful black owners, nearly a century after the plot was taken by the city of Manhattan Beach. Known as Bruce’s Beach, the resort had offered black families a place to enjoy California life and was a […]]]>


Some of the prime beachfront real estate in Southern California can now be returned to the descendants of its rightful black owners, nearly a century after the plot was taken by the city of Manhattan Beach.

Known as Bruce’s Beach, the resort had offered black families a place to enjoy California life and was a labor of love for owners Charles and Willa Bruce. But the harassment of white neighbors and the Ku Klux Klan ripped their dreams away. The final blow came in 1924 when the city took ownership through a prominent estate and paid the couple a fraction of what they asked for. The city wanted the land for a park.

Governor Gavin Newsom on Thursday signed a law that will allow the county to return the beachfront property to their descendants. The two lots are worth around $ 75 million in total, officials confirmed to CNN earlier this year. The homes right next to the property are priced at around $ 7 million each.

The new law was drafted by Senator Steve Bradford, who sits on the new state reparations task force.

“This is what the repairs look like,” Bradford said, insisting the county is not giving the Bruce family anything, but simply returning their stolen property.

The Bruces bought the land for $ 1,225 in 1912 and built several facilities, including a cafe and changing rooms. It was one of the few beaches that black residents could go to because so many other local beaches did not allow black bathers.

But some white neighbors resented the resort’s popularity, a spokesperson for the Bruce family told CNN earlier this year.

White supremacists and Klan members posted “no trespassing” signs and punctured tires so black families would avoid the area. The KKK attempted to set the property on fire and managed to burn down the home of a local black family nearby, county officials said earlier this year.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn told reporters that when scare tactics didn’t work, Manhattan Beach declared a prominent estate in 1924. The couple were ultimately paid around $ 14,125. They died five years later.

The city left the land vacant for several decades after taking possession of it in 1929.

Today the property is now a park with a lawn, parking and a lifeguard training center.

It no longer belongs to Manhattan Beach. Ownership transferred to the State and County of Los Angeles in 1995.

When county supervisors attempted to return the property to the Bruce family last spring, they found the state’s eminent estate law prevented them from doing so.

“If the Bruces had been allowed to keep the property they bought, the impact it would have had on generations not only of descendants of the Bruce family, but also on other African Americans who began to buy property. plots around Bruce’s Beach, ”said Holly, Los Angeles County Supervisor. Mitchell.

“The law was used to steal this property 100 years ago, and today’s law will return it,” said Hahn, who will take the next steps to identify Willa and Charles Bruce’s legal heirs and possibly return ownership to the family. .

“I hope people in California understand the importance of trying to right this wrong,” said Shepard, the family spokesperson.

State Senator Bradford said Charles and Willa Bruce’s story is not unique to California.

“Black-owned properties have suffered tremendous amounts of hatred, harassment, hostility and violence from the Ku Klux Klan, which in cold blood threatened the Bruces and other families who dared enjoy their property. “

The-CNN-Wire

™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Alexandra Meeks contributed to this report.


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How the effort to return California beach land to original black owners went – East Bay Times https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-california-beach-land-to-original-black-owners-went-east-bay-times/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-california-beach-land-to-original-black-owners-went-east-bay-times/ Manhattan Beach activist Kavon Ward was preparing her 4-year-old for a bath when she heard the news: A state bill that would pave the way for Los Angeles County to return two oceanfront plots of land in Manhattan Beach to the descendants of the original black owners was on its way for Gov. Gavin Newsom […]]]>


Manhattan Beach activist Kavon Ward was preparing her 4-year-old for a bath when she heard the news:

A state bill that would pave the way for Los Angeles County to return two oceanfront plots of land in Manhattan Beach to the descendants of the original black owners was on its way for Gov. Gavin Newsom for his signature.

“I started to cry and cry like a baby,” Ward said in an interview on Friday, Sept. 10, a day after the state Senate approved the bill. “I was tottering.”

Ward was one of the key figures in an ongoing movement to seek justice for Willa and Charles Bruce, who owned and operated a beachfront lodge for African Americans in the early 20th century, at a time when black people had limited access to the coast. . But the rulers of Manhattan Beach at the time used a prominent estate to take their property.

The city ultimately gave these two plots to the state, which decades later transferred them to the county. This latest transfer agreement prohibited the county from giving or selling the land to anyone else – which is why the state bill was needed.

Manhattan Beach, meanwhile, still has a much larger piece of land which it has also taken over via a prominent estate. This land eventually became a park. The area is now called Bruce’s Beach Park.

Ward, family representative Bruce Duane Shepard, county supervisor Janice Hahn and state senator Steven Bradford were among the most influential people in the land restitution effort, which officials say is a unique initiative in the country.

But how did Bruce’s Beach Lodge – the former seaside resort – and its owners go from a footnote in Manhattan Beach history to topics in national headlines and, ultimately, a joint effort of the State and county to make amends?

George Floyd and Juneteenth

The genesis of the Bruce’s Beach movement began amid a nationwide reckoning of police brutality and systemic racism.

Ward, like thousands of others across the country, became enraged after seeing the video last year of George Floyd, a black man, being killed by a white policeman in Minneapolis who knelt on his neck.

A wave of protests swept across the country, including in LA County. Even areas with relatively small black populations have seen protesters congregating, like Manhattan Beach.

Ward, who is black, has since formed a disbanded group of moms advocating anti-racism. It was during this time that she first learned the history of Bruce’s Beach through blog posts.

“Did this happen in the community where I lived? Ward wondered. ” How are you ? I wonder how many other people don’t know about this.

The answer, it turned out, was a lot.

“I am embarrassed to admit that I only learned about the history of Bruce’s Beach very recently,” Hahn said on Friday. “It wasn’t until the Black Lives Matter movement last summer and the Justice for Bruce’s Beach protests that I began to understand the history and injustice of what happened.”

Ward eventually formed the Justice for Bruce’s Beach group. But before that, she had planned a June 17, 2020 celebration at Bruce’s Beach Park.

The Double Purpose: To celebrate June 19, 1865, the day the last slaves in Texas learned their freedom, and to educate people about the history of the Bruces.

During the Juneteenth celebration, a TV reporter asked Ward what she would like to see happen with the earth.

Ward thought for a moment, then the answer hit her.

“I would like to see policies that would return this land to the family,” she replied.

“It came to me like that,” Ward said on Friday. “I mean, it makes sense. It was theirs. It should always be theirs.

And so, it seems, it will be soon.

Government action

But first, the movement had to gain momentum.

In July 2020, Black South Bay leaders shared their experiences of racism at a virtual panel discussion chaired by MP Al Muratsuchi.

A month later, Ward’s anti-racist group started a petition demanding reparations for the Bruce family. A week later, about 80 people marched from Manhattan Beach City Hall to Bruce’s Beach.

Then something big happened: Ward’s petition caught the attention of the national Black Lives Matter movement – which helped amplify the problem.

Manhattan Beach officials, for their part, decided to act in the months following the June 15 celebration. In August 2020, the city created a task force to explore repairs, examine the history of Bruce’s Beach, and update the wording for the Bruce’s Beach Park plaque.

But in September of that year, city council pointed out something: The plots the Bruce family once owned were not under the city’s control. On the contrary, the county now owned this land.

It surprised Hahn as well – and inspired her.

“It wasn’t until my staff and I got a map of the land in the area that I realized that the property Bruce owned was now owned by the county and that I had an opportunity to do something about it.” , said Hahn. “I decided then and there that if I had the power to return the land to the Bruces, this is what I would do.”

In February, Hahn, whose fourth borough includes Manhattan Beach, met Anthony Bruce, the great-great-grandson of Willa and Charles Bruce. Then she met with the county attorneys.

“They told me it had never been done before,” Hahn recalls, “but it was possible.”

So Hahn decided to make it so.

In April, Hahn, Bradford, other elected officials and the Bruce family gathered in Manhattan Beach to announce a joint effort: Supervisors would develop a plan to transfer the two plots to Bruce’s descendants and Bradford would draft Bill 796 from the Senate to allow the county to do so.

“The time is now for a major change,” Bradford said during the announcement, “and the public wants justice – not empty words.”

Shepard, for his part, gave a message of hope about the initiative and an idea he had for the near future.

“To take possession of our land,” he said in the April announcement, “and have a weeklong family reunion with 3,000 Black Bruces – right here on this beach.”

Legislative process

Bradford introduced the bill a week later.

But then began the often slow process of getting co-authors, tweaking the language, and sending the bill to committee.

The state Senate first passed the bill – unanimously in June – and sent it to the assembly.

Around the same time, Juneteenth’s second annual celebration took place at Bruce’s Beach. Hundreds attended. Family members Bruce, Ward, Hahn and Bradford all spoke out – and praised the efforts to return the land.

Shortly thereafter, LA County released the Plot Transfer Action Plan, which shows a complex process and lingering issues, including the future of a lifeguard tower that currently sits on both plots. . More information is expected to be released later this year.

Then came September – and a looming deadline. The legislative session was scheduled to end on Friday, September 10, and SB 796 was scheduled to pass by then.

The bill was considered by the relevant Assembly committees before being introduced earlier this week. It was adopted unanimously.

But not before the Assembly has added non-substantial amendments. The bill had to go through the Senate once again.

Ward knew the bill could narrow it down. She knows how the legislative bodies work. After all, she was a legislative member of the Congressional Black Caucus in 2007 for former US Representative Albert Wynn, D-Maryland.

“In my heart, I knew this would happen,” Ward said, “But there’s still that unease.”

After 7 p.m. on Thursday, September 9 – the day before the legislative session ended – the state Senate approved the bill for the second time. SB 796 is now awaiting Newsom’s signature.

“I just got this tide on me,” Ward said of this moment. “There was this feeling of like minds talking to me and saying, ‘You did it regardless of all the roadblocks. “”

All in all, the effort, at this point, took 14 months.

Work remains

Obstacles remain, however.

And Newsom signing the bill is perhaps the smallest of them.

A June note from county CEO Fesia Davenport detailed the complex steps required to transfer the land. This memo lists the main issues for the county to address:

  • Property Assessment: The county must assess both parcels, as well as all other parcels in Block 5.
  • Property tax issues: Transferring land can impose tax burdens on the family, and the county determines how to reduce this burden.
  • Relocation of the Lifeguard Training Center: If the Bruce family heirs choose not to lease the land to the county – which is an option – the LA County Fire Department Lifeguard Training Center will need to be relocated, a process that could take up to two years.
  • Lineage Determination: The county must review Charles and Willa Bruce’s legal heirs and may hire a third-party law firm to do so.

The CEO’s office and the Anti-Racism, Diversity and Inclusion Initiative should advise supervisors on how to proceed with the land transfer before the end of the year.

But Hahn, in a statement on Thursday, made it clear what his main focus was:

“I am determined,” said the supervisor, “to return Bruce’s Beach to the Bruce family. “


]]>
How the effort to return the California beach lands went to the original black owners https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-the-california-beach-lands-went-to-the-original-black-owners/ https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-the-california-beach-lands-went-to-the-original-black-owners/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-the-california-beach-lands-went-to-the-original-black-owners/ Manhattan Beach activist Kavon Ward was preparing her 4-year-old for a bath when she heard the news: A state bill that would pave the way for Los Angeles County to return two oceanfront plots of land in Manhattan Beach to the descendants of the original black owners was on its way for Gov. Gavin Newsom […]]]>


Manhattan Beach activist Kavon Ward was preparing her 4-year-old for a bath when she heard the news:

A state bill that would pave the way for Los Angeles County to return two oceanfront plots of land in Manhattan Beach to the descendants of the original black owners was on its way for Gov. Gavin Newsom for his signature.

“I started to cry and cry like a baby,” Ward said in an interview on Friday, Sept. 10, a day after the state Senate approved the bill. “I was tottering.”

Ward was one of the key figures in an ongoing movement to seek justice for Willa and Charles Bruce, who owned and operated a beachfront lodge for African Americans in the early 20th century, at a time when black people had limited access to the coast. . But the rulers of Manhattan Beach at the time used a prominent estate to take their property.

The city ultimately gave these two plots to the state, which decades later transferred them to the county. This latest transfer agreement prohibited the county from giving or selling the land to anyone – which is why the state bill was needed.

Manhattan Beach, meanwhile, still has a much larger piece of land which it has also taken over via a prominent estate. This land eventually became a park. The area is now called Bruce’s Beach Park.

Ward, family representative Bruce Duane Shepard, county supervisor Janice Hahn and state senator Steven Bradford were among the most influential people in the land restitution effort, which officials say is a unique initiative in the country.

But how did Bruce’s Beach Lodge – the former seaside resort – and its owners go from a footnote in Manhattan Beach history to topics in national headlines and, ultimately, a joint effort of the State and county to make amends?

George Floyd and Juneteenth

The genesis of the Bruce’s Beach movement began amid a nationwide reckoning of police brutality and systemic racism.

Ward, like thousands of others across the country, became enraged after seeing the video last year of George Floyd, a black man, being killed by a white policeman in Minneapolis who knelt on his neck.

A wave of protests swept across the country, including in LA County. Even areas with relatively small black populations have seen protesters congregating – like Manhattan Beach.

Ward, who is black, has since formed a disbanded group of moms advocating anti-racism. It was during this time that she first learned the history of Bruce’s Beach through blog posts.

“Did this happen in the community where I lived? Ward wondered. ” How are you ? I wonder how many other people don’t know about this.

The answer, it turned out, was a lot.

“I am embarrassed to admit that I only learned about the history of Bruce’s Beach very recently,” Hahn said on Friday. “It wasn’t until the Black Lives Matter movement last summer and the Justice for Bruce’s Beach protests that I began to understand the history and injustice of what happened.”

Ward eventually formed the Justice for Bruce’s Beach group. But before that, she had planned a June 17, 2020 celebration at Bruce’s Beach Park.

The goal is twofold: to celebrate June 19, 1865, the day the last slaves in Texas learned their freedom, and to share the history of the Bruce’s.

During the Juneteenth celebration, a TV reporter asked Ward what she would like to see happen with the earth.

Ward thought for a moment, then the answer hit her.

“I would like to see policies that would return this land to the family,” she replied.

“It came to me like that,” Ward said on Friday. “I mean, it makes sense. It was theirs. It should always be theirs.

And so, it seems, it will be soon.

Government action

But first, the movement had to gain momentum.

In July 2020, Black South Bay leaders shared their experiences of racism at a virtual panel discussion chaired by MP Al Muratsuchi.

A month later, Ward’s anti-racist group started a petition demanding reparations for the Bruce family. A week later, about 80 people marched from Manhattan Beach City Hall to Bruce’s Beach.

Then something big happened: Ward’s petition caught the attention of the national Black Lives Matter movement – which helped amplify the problem.

Manhattan Beach officials, for their part, decided to act in the months following the June 15 celebration. In August 2020, the city created a task force to explore repairs, examine the history of Bruce’s Beach, and update the wording for the Bruce’s Beach Park plaque.

But in September of that year, city council pointed out something: The plots the Bruce family once owned were not under the city’s control. On the contrary, the county owned this land now.

It surprised Hahn as well – and inspired her.

“It wasn’t until my staff and I got a map of the land in the area that I realized that the property Bruce owned was now owned by the county and that I had an opportunity to do something about it.” , said Hahn. “I decided then and there that if I had the power to return the land to the Bruces, this is what I would do.”

In February, Hahn, whose fourth borough includes Manhattan Beach, met Anthony Bruce, the great-great-grandson of Willa and Charles Bruce. Then she met with the county attorneys.

“They told me it had never been done before,” Hahn recalls, “but it was possible.”

Hahn therefore decided to do it.

In April, Hahn, Bradford, other elected officials and the Bruce family gathered in Manhattan Beach to announce a joint effort: Supervisors would develop a plan to transfer the two plots to Bruce’s descendants and Bradford would draft Senate Bill 796. to allow the county to do so.

“The time is now for a major change,” Bradford said during the announcement, “and the public wants justice – not empty words.”

Shepard, for his part, gave a message of hope about the initiative and an idea he had for the near future.

“To take possession of our land,” he said in the April announcement, “and have a weeklong family reunion with 3,000 Black Bruces – right here on this beach.”

Legislative process

Bradford introduced the bill a week later.

But then began the often slow process of getting co-authors, tweaking the language, and sending the bill to committee.

The state Senate first passed the bill – unanimously in June – and sent it to the assembly.

Around the same time, Juneteenth’s second annual celebration took place at Bruce’s Beach. Hundreds attended. Family members Bruce, Ward, Hahn and Bradford all spoke out – and praised the efforts to return the land.

Soon after, LA County released the Plot Transfer Action Plan, which shows a complex process and lingering questions, including the future of a rescue tower that currently sits on both plots. . More information is expected to be released later this year.

Then came September – and a looming deadline. The legislative session was scheduled to end on Friday, September 10, and SB 796 was scheduled to pass by then.

The bill traveled through relevant Assembly committees before being introduced earlier this week. It was adopted unanimously.

But not before the Assembly has added non-substantial amendments. The bill had to go through the Senate once again.

Ward knew Bill could cut him close. She knows how the legislative bodies work. After all, she was a legislative member of the Congressional Black Caucus in 2007 for former US Representative Albert Wynn, D-Maryland.

“In my heart, I knew this would happen,” Ward said, “But there’s still that unease.”

After 7 p.m. on Thursday, September 9 – the day before the legislative session ended – the state Senate approved the bill for the second time. SB 796 is now awaiting Newsom’s signature.

“I just had this tide come over me,” Ward said of that moment. “There was this feeling of like minds talking to me and saying, ‘You did it regardless of all the roadblocks. “”

All in all, the effort, at this point, took 14 months.

Work remains

Obstacles remain, however.

And Newsom signing the bill is perhaps the smallest of them.

A June note from county CEO Fesia Davenport detailed the complex steps required to transfer the land. This memo lists the main issues for the county to address:

  • Property Assessment: The county must assess both parcels, as well as all other parcels in Block 5.
  • Property Tax Issues: The land transfer can impose tax burdens on the family and the county determines how to reduce that burden.
  • Relocation of the Lifeguard Training Center: If the Bruce family heirs choose not to lease the land to the county – which is an option – the LA County Fire Department Lifeguard Training Center will need to be relocated, a process that could take up to two years.
  • Lineage Determination: The county must review Charles and Willa Bruce’s legal heirs and may hire a third-party law firm to do so.

The CEO’s office and the Anti-Racism, Diversity and Inclusion Initiative should advise supervisors on how to proceed with the land transfer before the end of the year.

But Hahn, in a statement on Thursday, made it clear what his main focus was:

“I am determined,” said the supervisor, “to return Bruce’s Beach to the Bruce family.”


]]>
https://orland-ca.com/how-the-effort-to-return-the-california-beach-lands-went-to-the-original-black-owners/feed/ 0
Bill to Return California Beach to Original Black Owners Gets Final State Senate Approval, Goes to Governor’s Office – East Bay Times https://orland-ca.com/bill-to-return-california-beach-to-original-black-owners-gets-final-state-senate-approval-goes-to-governors-office-east-bay-times/ https://orland-ca.com/bill-to-return-california-beach-to-original-black-owners-gets-final-state-senate-approval-goes-to-governors-office-east-bay-times/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/bill-to-return-california-beach-to-original-black-owners-gets-final-state-senate-approval-goes-to-governors-office-east-bay-times/ Los Angeles County will soon be able to return waterfront land in Manhattan Beach to its original black owners, thanks to a one-of-a-kind bill that is on its way to Governor Gavin Newsom. A state Senate bill to give LA County the power to transfer two plots of land to descendants of Willa and Charles […]]]>


Los Angeles County will soon be able to return waterfront land in Manhattan Beach to its original black owners, thanks to a one-of-a-kind bill that is on its way to Governor Gavin Newsom.

A state Senate bill to give LA County the power to transfer two plots of land to descendants of Willa and Charles Bruce lifted the last legislative hurdle Thursday evening, September 9. The Senate unanimously passed SB 796 on the eve of the legislative session. end.

“I am delighted to be walking on the water right now,” Duane Shepard, a distant descendant of Bruce and family historian, said Thursday evening. “It’s one of the greatest things in American history right now.”

Thursday was the second time the Senate passed the bill without dissent – the first time was in June – a procedural requirement after the Assembly added non-substantial amendments to it. The assembly unanimously approved the bill on Wednesday.

Newsom must now sign the invoice.

It will take a few days at most for the physical pages of the bill to be processed and sent to the governor, according to the office of Senator Steven Bradford, D-Gardena, who drafted SB 796.

Newsom has not hinted at whether he will sign the bill. A Newsom spokesperson said in an email Thursday evening that the bill will be assessed once it reaches his office.

But SB 796 has received broad bipartisan support at this point.

“SB 796 represents economic and historical justice,” Bradford said, “and is a model of what reparations can really look like. “

Willa and Charles Bruce purchased two oceanfront plots of land in Manhattan Beach in 1912. The couple operated a thriving African-American resort there at a time when blacks had limited access to the ocean. But they, along with those who visited the resort and other African-American residents of Manhattan Beach, were harassed by some white neighbors who did not want blacks in the community, according to historical documents.

  • Willa Bruce, the first owner of Bruce’s Beach, circa 1920 in front of her seaside resort. Bruce’s Beach was the only point of access to the ocean for blacks in Los Angeles at the time. (Courtesy Jan Dennis)

  • Wedding portrait of Charles and Willa Bruce. On March 3, 2007, dozens of people gathered for the Bruce’s Beach name change ceremony in Manhattan Beach. (File photo of Daily Breeze)

  • Willa Bruce, son Harvey Bruce and daughter-in-law Meda sat outside Bruce’s Beach Lodge circa 1920 (File photo from the Daily Breeze blog)

  • Map of the Bruce plots near Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach. (Jeff Goertzen)

  • Senate Bill 796, which would allow LA County to return Manhattan Beach land to its original black owners, was passed a second time in the Senate on Thursday, September 9, 2021, sending it to the governor’s office . In this April 2021 file photo, Kavon Ward, founder of Justice for Bruce’s Beach, speaks at a press conference in Manhattan Beach on Friday, April 9, 2021. The event was held to shed some light on the efforts of LA County Supervisor Janice Hahn to have the LA County begin to right the wrongs of the past and bring justice to the descendants of Charles and Willa Bruce, returning the land of Bruce’s Beach to them. Currently, a county rescue building sits on the grounds. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram / SCNG)

  • This aerial view of Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach shows the Los Angeles County Lifeguard Training Center partly on Plots 8 and 9, once owned by Willa and Charles Bruce, a black couple who were robbed land under a prominent estate proceeding in 1924. (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Bruce’s Beach in Manhattan Beach on Thursday, April 8, 2021 (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

Manhattan Beach management at the time condemned the Bruce’s land, along with that of other landowners, in 1924 and reclaimed it through a prominent estate.

Manhattan Beach still owns the land it got from other owners through a prominent estate. This land sits above the two Bruce plots and decades later became Bruce’s Beach Park.

But the city ceded the Bruce lands to the state in 1948. The state turned those plots and larger stretches of beach over to Los Angeles County in 1995.

Under this transfer, the county, which operates a lifeguard station at the former Bruce’s Beach Lodge, cannot give or sell the land to anyone.

SB 796 will let the county do just that.

“Time and time again different government agencies have used their power to deny wealth and opportunity to many communities of color,” Bradford said Thursday. “This bill represents an opportunity for this government to finally do the right thing: right a wrong committed by Manhattan Beach and assisted by the state and the county in taking possession of this property.”

The effort to return the land to the Bruces began last summer amid nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism. A June 10 celebration was held at Bruce’s Beach Park, also serving to educate attendees about the history of discrimination open space namesakes have faced. A petition demanding reparations then followed.

In April, Bradford, Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn, and others gathered to announce the joint state and county effort to return the two plots to Bruce’s descendants.

At the time, these officials said the effort would be the first time in the country’s history that land would be returned to an African-American family in order to make amends for various discriminatory policies, including redlining, which prevented blacks create wealth through land ownership.

“I am happy for the Charles and Willa Bruce family and for our people across the country, indigenous as well as African American,” said Shepard, spokesperson for the Bruce family, on Thursday. “This is going to be the start of something really important for our people now. “

Shepard said he hadn’t moved from his computer for the past two days while watching Assembly and Senate sessions – and waiting for SB 796 to pass.

“I thought they were going to adjourn and resume tomorrow,” he said, “but I didn’t budge until I saw this bill come up.”

Kavon Ward, the founder of Justice for Bruce’s Beach who spearheaded the June 17 celebration last year, was equally thrilled with the passage of the bill.

“I cried all day,” she said in a text message. “I can not believe it.”

But several steps remain to be taken before the Bruce family can take control of the territory.

First, Newsom must sign SB 796.

If he does, the bill would come into force immediately because of an emergency clause.

And then LA County would be responsible for returning the land.

“I am determined to return Bruce’s Beach to the Bruce family, but I cannot do it without this legislation,” Hahn, whose district includes Manhattan Beach, said in a statement Thursday. “I was so moved by the overwhelming support we got for this effort in Sacramento. Finally, this bill is heading to Gov. Newsom’s office. Not only do I urge him to sign it, but I think so too. that it would mean so much if he signed it at Bruce’s Beach.

It is not yet known if Newsom would do so. But he is expected to travel to nearby Long Beach on Monday, September 13, for a campaign rally with President Joe Biden in an attempt to avoid a recall.

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, meanwhile, asked officials in July to pursue an action plan to return both plots to Bruce’s descendants.

A report on this plan, prepared by the county CEO’s office and the Anti-Racism, Diversity and Inclusion Initiative, detailed the complex processes involved in transferring land, assessing property value , the determination of the identity of the legal heirs, the limitation of the property tax burden. on the family and determine what to do with the first aid station. More details will come later this year on how to transfer the land once the state allows the county to do so.

State Director of Parks and Recreation Armando Quintero will need to amend the county deed by December 31 to exclude Bruce ownership from the land transfer restrictions that currently exist.

“This is the first time a government has done something like this,” Hahn said in July, “and there were a lot of questions about how it would work.”


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Father of five attacked by homeless people on a California beach https://orland-ca.com/father-of-five-attacked-by-homeless-people-on-a-california-beach/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/father-of-five-attacked-by-homeless-people-on-a-california-beach/ Two homeless men attacked a father of five with a machete on a California beach – leaving him with horrific injuries, authorities said. The out-of-town family was having lunch on Dan Blocker Beach in Malibu on Sunday when two homeless men approached, telling them they “weren’t allowed” there, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s […]]]>

Two homeless men attacked a father of five with a machete on a California beach – leaving him with horrific injuries, authorities said.

The out-of-town family was having lunch on Dan Blocker Beach in Malibu on Sunday when two homeless men approached, telling them they “weren’t allowed” there, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

An argument ensued and one of the suspects, Richard Franck, pulled out a machete and began hacking the father, cutting off the man’s upper torso and hand, the County Sheriff’s Department said. Los Angeles.

Franck and another homeless man, Benjamin Mast, then chased the family of five from the beach to a parking lot near the Pacific Coast Highway, the deputies told the Malibu Times.

LASD

About 20 officers responded to the scene, and Franck and Mast were later arrested after a brief standoff in the parking lot, where they had “locked themselves” in a toilet, LASD officials told the newspaper.

“Through various statements from the suspect and the accomplice, the weapon was found hidden in some bushes near the beach,” LASD Lt. Jim Braden said.

Malibu.  California
The attack came as the homeless crisis in Malibu continues to deteriorate.
Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Both Franck and Mast have been described as transients in their thirties. No further information about them was immediately available, the Malibu Times reported.

Prosecutors detailed the father’s gruesome injuries on Wednesday, saying the machete attack left him disfigured with a severed tongue, a lost eye and cuts to his nose, ear and lip.

Franck was charged with attempted murder, maiming and assault with a deadly weapon, while Mast was charged with aiding and abetting attempted murder.

Malibu Mayor Paul Grisanti said he was shocked by the “vicious and unprovoked attack” on the visiting family.

“On behalf of the city council, I want to thank our local sheriff’s deputies for their quick response in removing the suspects before they can harm anyone else,” Grisanti said in a statement.

The attack came as Malibu’s homelessness crisis continues to deteriorate, with recent crimes and fires resulting from people passing through the area. Community members held a meeting Thursday evening to address public safety concerns, KTTV reported.

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California hotel buying spree hits record highs – Orange County Register https://orland-ca.com/california-hotel-buying-spree-hits-record-highs-orange-county-register/ https://orland-ca.com/california-hotel-buying-spree-hits-record-highs-orange-county-register/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-hotel-buying-spree-hits-record-highs-orange-county-register/ “Bubble Watch” explores trends that may indicate upcoming economic and / or real estate issues. Buzz: It’s not just houses that are being swallowed up at a breakneck pace. An astonishing thirst for California hotels has helped break many sales records in the first six months of 2021 – a bet by investors that the […]]]>


“Bubble Watch” explores trends that may indicate upcoming economic and / or real estate issues.

Buzz: It’s not just houses that are being swallowed up at a breakneck pace. An astonishing thirst for California hotels has helped break many sales records in the first six months of 2021 – a bet by investors that the woes of the pandemic era of tourism are almost over.

Source: Semi-annual sales monitoring report by Atlas Hospitality Group.

The trend

Let’s look at the extent of the hotel industry‘s buying frenzy …

Offers: 243 transactions in the first six months of 2021 surpassed the previous record set in 2017 by 42%. Compared to the depressed first half of 2020, sales increased 157%.

Dollars: $ 5.26 billion spent on these transactions in 2021 was 23 percent above the previous record set in 2015. Compared to viruses cooled from January to June of last year, total dollar sales jumped 4.3 billion dollars or 451%.

I emailed Atlas President Alan Reay about his report, just writing “Wow”.

“’Wow’ is an understatement,” he replied.

Dissection

Just a year ago, most California hotels were either closed or scaled-down as the closures dampened interest in travel.

The shift from deathbed to boom surprised Atlas researchers, whose report says “no one could have predicted the kind of incredible revenue and rebound we’ve seen.”

How “wow” has the hospitality market in the four counties covered by the Southern California News Group been? Watch the surge in sales trends…

Los Angeles County: 48 transactions were recorded in the first half of the year compared to 16 a year earlier. These transactions totaled $ 911 million, up 606% in one year. Two hotels tied for the most expensive sale – the 580-room Hyatt Regency LAX and the 175-room JW Marriott Le Merigot Santa Monica. Both sold for $ 75 million.

Orange County: 29 transactions compared to nine a year earlier; valued at $ 529 million, up 255%. The most expensive ? Element Hotel Anaheim Resort with 174 rooms at $ 65 million.

Riverside County: 20 transactions compared to 13 a year earlier; valued at $ 139 million, up 81%. The most expensive ? 198-room Embassy Suites in Palm Desert at $ 21 million.

San Bernardino County: 15 transactions compared to 10 a year earlier; $ 83 million, up 23%. Most expensive: 200-room Residence Inn Convention Center Ontario at $ 24 million.

The increase in binge eating from January to June was more pronounced in Northern California than in Southern California.

North: 141 hotels purchased, tripling the 47 transactions of the first half of 2020. These sales amounted to $ 2.8 billion, up 578%.

South: 152 hotels purchased, up 127%. Value? $ 2.46 billion, an increase of 354%.

Reay told me that the selling frenzy is “a combination of a huge amount of available investment capital and investors seeing California hotels as offering some of the best long-term returns.”

“I think that also plays in hedging against inflation,” he said. “Hotels are able to change rates on a daily basis, unlike commercial, office and industrial buildings which are typically stuck in long-term leases with caps on rent increases. “

Most notable

The 59-room Alila Ventana Inn & Spa in Big Sur – a 160-acre resort where room rates can exceed $ 2,500 a night – sold for $ 148 million. That price is equivalent to $ 2.51 million per room, which is 22% more than the previous California record per room set in 2019 by the Montage Beverly Hills of 201 rooms.

How sparkling?

On a scale of zero bubble (no bubble here) to five bubbles (five alarm alert) … THREE BUBBLES!

Reay’s assessment: “We’re not quite where we are with residential home sales in California, but hotels are getting closer!

He added that hotel reviews still seemed reasonable – even as the statewide median price per room jumped 13% to a record high near $ 127,647.

“It’s good, well below the cost of replacement,” he says. “A new hotel cost today in California, assuming ground-level parking, is over $ 200,000 per room, excluding the cost of land and furniture, fixtures and equipment. If you have to park underground it goes to $ 250,000 to $ 300,000 per room.

Second quarter hotel sales data. (Courtesy: Atlas Hospitality)

Jonathan Lansner is the business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be contacted at jlansner@scng.com. George Avalos of the Bay Area News Group contributed to this report.


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Miles of Southern California beach have been closed following the spill of 17 million gallons of sewage https://orland-ca.com/miles-of-southern-california-beach-have-been-closed-following-the-spill-of-17-million-gallons-of-sewage/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/miles-of-southern-california-beach-have-been-closed-following-the-spill-of-17-million-gallons-of-sewage/ Several miles of Los Angeles-area beaches were closed to swimmers after 17 million gallons of untreated sewage was dumped from a treatment plant in Santa Monica Bay on Sunday. Los Angeles County Public Supervisor Janice Hahn said via Twitter that a mechanical failure at the Hyperion Water Recovery Plant, the city’s largest treatment plant, resulted […]]]>


Several miles of Los Angeles-area beaches were closed to swimmers after 17 million gallons of untreated sewage was dumped from a treatment plant in Santa Monica Bay on Sunday.

Los Angeles County Public Supervisor Janice Hahn said via Twitter that a mechanical failure at the Hyperion Water Recovery Plant, the city’s largest treatment plant, resulted in a massive release of water worn.

Plant officials said the facility was “inundated with overwhelming amounts of debris, saving the upstream facilities.”

The plant’s back-up system was triggered and the wastewater flow was controlled through the use of the plant’s mile-long outlet and the discharge of untreated wastewater into the plant. Santa Monica Bay, ”plant officials said. in a report.

“About 17 million gallons of sewage (representing six percent of a daily load) were unloaded as an emergency measure to prevent the plant from going completely offline and discharging much more raw sewage “, they declared.


America is changing faster than ever! Add Change America to your Facebook Where Twitter feed to stay up to date with the latest news.


The spill resulted in the closure of El Segundo Beach, Grand Avenue storm sewer and Dockweiler State Beach at Water Way Extension and Hyperion Plant, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. About 4 miles of beach had to close.

Health officials have warned residents to avoid contact with seawater in the area and said beaches will remain closed until water samples are confirmed negative for bacteria, which should take about 24 hours.

“I understand that the plant was able to prevent an even larger spill, but we will need answers on how and why it happened”, Hahn tweeted.


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California restaurants and hotels lead job creation https://orland-ca.com/california-restaurants-and-hotels-lead-job-creation/ https://orland-ca.com/california-restaurants-and-hotels-lead-job-creation/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-restaurants-and-hotels-lead-job-creation/ California accounted for a disproportionate portion of the nation’s new jobs last month, although its path to economic recovery from the pandemic remains steep. “In April, California was the locomotive that drove the US economy forward,” said Sung Won Sohn, professor of finance and economics at Loyola Marymount University. The Golden State created 38% of […]]]>


California accounted for a disproportionate portion of the nation’s new jobs last month, although its path to economic recovery from the pandemic remains steep.

“In April, California was the locomotive that drove the US economy forward,” said Sung Won Sohn, professor of finance and economics at Loyola Marymount University. The Golden State created 38% of the country’s new jobs in April. But that was mainly due to the state coming out of a “harsher and longer lockdown than in many parts of the country,” Sohn said.

California still has a long way to go to recover from its deep pandemic COVID-19 recession: more than half of the jobs it has lost have yet to be restored. The unemployment rate remained stagnant in April at 8.3%, the same as in March, state officials reported on Friday.

Although the state’s pace of job creation was relatively robust in April, it slowed slightly from the previous month. Employers added 101,800 new positions last month for a total of more than 16.2 million. This was less than the 132,400 jobs created in March.

Almost two-thirds of job growth in California over the past three months has been in leisure and hospitality activities that have been damaged the most during the pandemic. Their employment level remained 28% below the pre-pandemic level.

In Los Angeles County, which relies heavily on tourism, the economy has remained in dire straits. Unemployment rose to 11.7% from 11.4% in March and more than half a million people were counted as unemployed.

“Los Angeles has been particularly affected by the closures or severe limitations of critical industries such as hotels, restaurants, travel, entertainment and film production,” said Lynn Reaser, economist at Point Loma University. Nazarene from San Diego.

The state’s unemployment rate was the second highest in the country in April, after Hawaii’s at 8.5%. US unemployment stood at 6.1% last month.

Year after year, California’s job growth has been slower than that of the country; the state gained 8.7%, against 10.9% for the United States

Still, economists are increasingly optimistic after Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the state’s economy is expected to fully reopen by June 15. “California’s economy is set to explode this summer when trade restrictions are lifted,” Reaser said.

Pomona College economist Fernando Lozano suggested job creation was “moderate” last month, as many schools were only partially open, childcare services were scarce and loans to children were available. Federal businesses had dried up. “Many households have moved to more affordable areas, but jobs are reopening in the more expensive urban communities,” he said.

Pepperdine University economist David M. Smith has predicted that Golden State’s economy will reach full employment by fall. Despite the geographic lags, “California is a job-creating machine,” he said. “Unemployment in tech-dominated San Francisco is less than half that of Los Angeles with its small businesses and its entertainment and hospitality industries the hardest hit.”

Neel Sodha, the founder of LA Walking Tours, cut the hours of his 13 guides during the pandemic. His company’s revenue remains half of what it was before the virus hit, despite the easing of COVID restrictions. “You would think that with the vaccines coming out and the cases falling, there would be more business,” he said. “It doesn’t happen.”

Tourists remain wary of spending time with foreigners on a two-hour visit, and the limits of international travel are hampering business, he said. Before the pandemic, foreign tourists represented around 20% of its clientele. Now he rarely sees an international traveler and around 90% of his customers are locals.

April Clemmer, owner of Old Hollywood Walking Tours, a one-man business, said her business completely dried up when the pandemic struck. She took her reservation calendar and started giving virtual tours, during which clients could watch her presentation of 1930s Hollywood on their computer screens.

Private tours, which allow groups of family or friends to avoid the danger of walking near strangers, have also been helpful. Now that the virus has subsided, customers have started to inquire about public tours. “I feel like it’s starting again,” she said.

Clemmer is so optimistic that she is training a second tour guide to handle what she expects to be a summer wave.

Statewide, April employment increased in seven of California’s major industrial sectors. The biggest gain – 62,800 jobs in leisure and hospitality – is mainly due to the reopening of full-service restaurants, officials said.

The professional and business services sector, which includes lawyers, accountants and technical specialists, added 19,000 jobs. The payroll for the “other services” sector, which includes hairdressers, auto repair shops and other miscellaneous businesses, increased by 10,500.

The biggest loss was in the information industry, which lost 3,500 jobs, mostly in software publishing.

Los Angeles County payrolls added 34,600 jobs in April for a total of more than 4.14 million. The leisure and hotel sector represents 58% of new jobs. Jobs in health care and social assistance increased by 6,000.

Orange County payrolls added 23,800 jobs for a total of over 1.54 million. Leisure and hospitality accounted for 56% of the gain. Unemployment slipped to 6.2% from 6.3% in March.

The Inland Empire, which spans Riverside and San Bernardino counties, has created 6,700 salaried jobs for a total of over 1.51 million. Leisure and hospitality account for 4,500 of the new jobs. The unemployment rate was 7.6%, down from 7.7% in March.

Employment data for April is based on two federal surveys conducted in the second week of the month. The payroll jobs figures are based on a survey of 80,000 California companies. The unemployment rate is taken from a separate survey of 5,100 households.


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