California parks – Orland CA http://orland-ca.com/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:22:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://orland-ca.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg California parks – Orland CA http://orland-ca.com/ 32 32 California parks still have campgrounds for family and group gatherings https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-still-have-campgrounds-for-family-and-group-gatherings-2/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-still-have-campgrounds-for-family-and-group-gatherings-2/ With summer on the upstate, where can people find inexpensive group campsites that can accommodate 25 or more tents? It is always possible to reserve a large campsite for a family reunion, a club retreat or a scout excursion. Popular campgrounds at most parks book up months in advance and are full all summer, but […]]]>

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California parks still have campgrounds for family and group gatherings https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-still-have-campgrounds-for-family-and-group-gatherings/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-still-have-campgrounds-for-family-and-group-gatherings/ With summer on the upstate, where can people find inexpensive group campsites that can accommodate 25 or more tents? It is always possible to reserve a large campsite for a family reunion, a club retreat or a scout excursion. Popular campgrounds at most parks book up months in advance and are full all summer, but […]]]>

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Free Military Vacation Pass at California Parks https://orland-ca.com/free-military-vacation-pass-at-california-parks/ Sat, 28 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/free-military-vacation-pass-at-california-parks/ California State Parks Logo Sonora, CA – To thank the military for their service with free admission to state parks on Memorial Day for service members, past and present. California State Parks is honoring service veterans, serving military, and reserves, offering them free admission to participating parks on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. A total […]]]>

Sonora, CA – To thank the military for their service with free admission to state parks on Memorial Day for service members, past and present.

California State Parks is honoring service veterans, serving military, and reserves, offering them free admission to participating parks on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30. A total of 133 parks will honor free admission this year, including state vehicle recreation areas and the California State Railroad Museum.

“To honor the brave men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, State Parks is offering military members free admission to some of the most amazing places in California’s state park system,” said the Director of California State Parks, Armando Quintero. “Thank you for your service.”

To enter participating state parks, members of the military must present valid military identification or proof of discharge other than dishonorable or improper conduct in order to receive free admission.

Park officials are anticipating large crowds this holiday weekend, one of the busiest of the year. As noted here, an uptick in COVID cases in the state has them reminding visitors to recreate responsibly. Before leaving home, visitors are advised to check the status of the parks they wish to visit for current restrictions and guidelines. Also, it is recommended to have a backup plan in case their destination gets crowded. For additional pandemic guidelines and safety information, click here. The key to an enjoyable holiday weekend is to recreate responsibly, and park officials provide these tips:

  • Know Before You Go – Before you leave home, check the state of the park unit you wish to visit for any restrictions and guidelines. Have a backup plan in case your destination is crowded.
  • Play it safe – Learn about precautions to take when exploring the outdoors, especially if this is your first visit to the State Park System. parks.ca.gov/SafetyTips
  • Be Aware of Fire Dangers – Be aware of red flag warnings and campfire restrictions.
  • Wear a Life Jacket – Everyone should wear a properly fitted life jacket. Coastguard approved life jacket when you are in or near water. You never know when an accident may happen, and a life jacket can help save you until search and rescue help can arrive. In whitewater, even the strongest swimmers can be easily overwhelmed. The moment a person is struggling in the water, a rescue is extremely unlikely and puts the rescuer in danger.
  • Leave No Trace– Leave areas as you found them by staying on designated trails and packing up all trash. Do not disturb wildlife or plants.

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Library Cardholders Can Now Obtain Free California Parks Vehicle Passes From Local Libraries https://orland-ca.com/library-cardholders-can-now-obtain-free-california-parks-vehicle-passes-from-local-libraries/ Tue, 03 May 2022 00:18:20 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/library-cardholders-can-now-obtain-free-california-parks-vehicle-passes-from-local-libraries/ As summer is fast approaching, Californians can rest easy knowing they have a streamlined way to get to the state’s parks and beaches. If you are a Long Beach resident, all you have to do is stand in line, that is, virtually. As part of a three-year pilot program and partnership between California State Parks […]]]>

As summer is fast approaching, Californians can rest easy knowing they have a streamlined way to get to the state’s parks and beaches. If you are a Long Beach resident, all you have to do is stand in line, that is, virtually.

As part of a three-year pilot program and partnership between California State Parks and the California State Library, the City of Long Beach has joined the rest of the state’s public libraries in April to receive a vehicle admission pass to “more than 200 participating state parks and beach locations,” according to a city release.

The city’s 12 library branches received a total of 13 passes on April 23, as part of the first phase of the three-year pilot program.

“We don’t have them all yet,” said Susan Jones, director of main library services. “By the end of May, each outlet will have three passes each.”

The program, Jones explained, aims to remove any barriers, financial or geographic, that might prevent families or young people from exploring the places California has to offer. Library patrons simply request a park pass through the online catalog and then wait for their branch to receive a pass.

“It reduces barriers, if you can’t afford those parking fees. Right here [at the Billie Jean King Library], we validate parking, but if you exceed 30 minutes there will be an additional charge of $2. Even that $2 is something some people can’t afford,” Jones said. “It’s a great opportunity for families to say, ‘Let’s go do something that we wouldn’t have done before, let’s explore, get out of the house and break this cycle.'”

Although Long Beach branches received the passes less than a week ago, the waiting list to verify a pass for the allotted seven days is already at 61 people, according to Jones.

“We’re seeing people not keeping them for the full seven days,” Jones said, explaining that the city is expected to receive 23 more passes by the end of May, resulting in “a faster turnaround time.” “.

Passes are available to anyone who has a public library card and has no late fees. They can be checked for a total of seven days and provide access to one vehicle, with nine people or fewer, entering a California state park or beach.

To further reduce the hassle of reserving a park pass, residents can request that a pass be dropped off at the library closest to them once it becomes available, similar to ask for books, magazines or media, Jones explained.

“With summer just around the corner, it’s wonderful that our library system is working to help break down barriers to accessing our state parks and beaches so our residents can enjoy the incredible spaces California Open,” Mayor Robert Garcia said in a statement.

The California State Library has created a map showing the locations of libraries offering park passes, as well as entry points to California parks.

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Library Cardholders Can Now Obtain Free California Parks Vehicle Passes From Local Libraries https://orland-ca.com/library-cardholders-can-now-obtain-free-california-parks-vehicle-passes-from-local-libraries-2/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/library-cardholders-can-now-obtain-free-california-parks-vehicle-passes-from-local-libraries-2/ As summer is fast approaching, Californians can rest easy knowing they have a streamlined way to get to the state’s parks and beaches. If you are a Long Beach resident, all you have to do is stand in line, that is, virtually. As part of a three-year pilot program and partnership between California State Parks […]]]>

As summer is fast approaching, Californians can rest easy knowing they have a streamlined way to get to the state’s parks and beaches. If you are a Long Beach resident, all you have to do is stand in line, that is, virtually.

As part of a three-year pilot program and partnership between California State Parks and the California State Library, the City of Long Beach has joined the rest of the state’s public libraries in April by receiving a day-use vehicle admission pass to “more than 200 participating state parks and beach locations,” according to a city release.

The city’s 12 library branches received a total of 13 passes on April 23, as part of the first phase of the three-year pilot program.

“We don’t have them all yet,” said Susan Jones, director of main library services. “By the end of May, each outlet will have three passes each.”

The program, Jones explained, aims to remove any barriers, financial or geographic, that might prevent families or young people from exploring the places California has to offer. Library patrons simply request a park pass through the online catalog and then wait for their branch to receive a pass.

“It lowers the barriers, if you can’t afford those parking fees. here [at the Billie Jean King Library], we validate parking, but if you exceed 30 minutes there will be an additional charge of $2. Even that $2 is something some people can’t afford,” Jones said. “It’s a great opportunity for families to say, ‘Let’s go do something that we wouldn’t have done before, let’s explore, get out of the house and break this cycle.'”

Although Long Beach branches received the passes less than a week ago, the waiting list to verify a pass for the allotted seven days is already at 61 people, according to Jones.

“We’re seeing people not keeping them for the full seven days,” Jones said, explaining that the city is expected to receive 23 more passes by the end of May, resulting in “a faster turnaround time.” “.

Passes are available to anyone who has a public library card and has no late fees. They can be checked for a total of seven days and provide access to one vehicle, with nine people or fewer, entering a California state park or beach.

To further reduce the hassle of reserving a park pass, residents can request that a pass be dropped off at the library closest to them once it becomes available, similar to ask for books, magazines or media, Jones explained.

“With summer just around the corner, it’s wonderful that our library system is working to help break down barriers to accessing our state parks and beaches so our residents can enjoy the incredible spaces. California Open,” Mayor Robert Garcia said in a statement.

The California State Library has created a map showing the locations of libraries offering park passes, as well as entry points to California parks.

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California Parks and Recreation Society Recognizes City of Burbank for Outstanding Achievement https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-and-recreation-society-recognizes-city-of-burbank-for-outstanding-achievement/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-and-recreation-society-recognizes-city-of-burbank-for-outstanding-achievement/ The Department of Parks and Recreation has been recognized by the California Parks and Recreation Society (CPRS) for outstanding achievement as “best of the best” in the areas of community building; marketing communication; and Rising Star – Aquatic Section. All three awards will be presented at the annual CPRS Connections conference and exhibition. The Department […]]]>

The Department of Parks and Recreation has been recognized by the California Parks and Recreation Society (CPRS) for outstanding achievement as “best of the best” in the areas of community building; marketing communication; and Rising Star – Aquatic Section. All three awards will be presented at the annual CPRS Connections conference and exhibition.

The Department prides itself on providing well-maintained recreational facilities and developing programs to meet the recreational, cultural, and social needs of the Burbank community. The “Best of the Best” awards reflect the exceptional services provided by the Department. The three prizes include:

VSrFood Community Achievement Award for Project HOPE

The Burbank Volunteer Program (BVP) and Adults 55+ sections have been selected as recipients of the Community Building Excellence Award for Project HOPE’s “Helping Others Prosper Every Day” campaign. Essential services provided during the COVID-19 pandemic by Project HOPE to seniors included grocery deliveries, prescription pickups, and post office errands. Despite having to close facilities due to the COVID-19 pandemic, staff at Joslyn Adult Center have found ways to keep the senior community safe and connected.

MaMarketing & Communications Award of Excellence for “Plant for a Greener Burbank”

The Parks and Recreation Marketing section was selected as the recipient of the Excellence in Marketing and Communications Award. The “Plant for a Greener Burbank” marketing campaign was instrumental in the collaborative campaign to plant over 650 trees for the year 2021.

Rising Star Award Winner in the Aquatic Section – Michael Singhanate, Aquatic Coordinator

Michael Singhanate, Aquatic Coordinator, is the recipient of the CPRS Aquatic Section Rising Star Award. This award recognizes the contributions of rising stars who work on behalf of the CPRS Aquatic Section to advance the profession and who strengthen and support the CPRS Aquatic Section as a professional organization. This award is the result of Michael’s resilience, dedication and innovation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Michael successfully prepared a state grant application to fund the renovation of the McCambridge Pool; aquatic programming adapted to operate safely throughout the COVID-19 pandemic; and developed a

effective recruitment strategy to maintain staff resources and program levels to meet community needs. Thanks in large part to Michael’s efforts, Burbank’s aquatic facilities were the first to reopen to the public in Los Angeles County after the initial shutdown of the COVID-19 pandemic.

CPRS is a membership organization with just over 4,000 members representing the 535 local parks and recreation agencies statewide. The mission of CPRS is to advance the profession and its members through education, networking, resources and advocacy. For more information, visit www.cprs.org.

Carewalk
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Ortiz-Legg serving on the California Parks Board of Directors https://orland-ca.com/ortiz-legg-serving-on-the-california-parks-board-of-directors/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/ortiz-legg-serving-on-the-california-parks-board-of-directors/ SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — San Luis Obispo County Supervisor Dawn Ortiz-Legg was recently named to the Parks California Board of Directors. She says she is the first Central Coast representative on the California State Parks partner agency board and hopes to bring more resources to state parks locally. Ensuring that parks remain accessible to […]]]>

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — San Luis Obispo County Supervisor Dawn Ortiz-Legg was recently named to the Parks California Board of Directors. She says she is the first Central Coast representative on the California State Parks partner agency board and hopes to bring more resources to state parks locally.

Ensuring that parks remain accessible to the public is a goal of Parks California. Regarding access to the Oceano Dunes, Ortiz-Legg says, “My biggest concern is making sure people can get out. Those people who are in wheelchairs, those people who may not have access to nature, this is a very important element in order to be able to guarantee the accessibility of our parks.”

California State Parks have supported the efforts of people trying to avoid rolling in the Oceano Dunes. In 2021, the Coast Commission ordered an end to off-road driving in the dunes within three years, citing air quality and health concerns, and saying it degrades animal habitat.

“So my hope for what the state park system can do in the Dunes is to keep it affordable,” Ortiz-Legg continued. “To keep it accessible and to make sure people can still enjoy it. Whatever shape and form comes in, I don’t know.”

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California parks stole the show in this Will Smith flop https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-stole-the-show-in-this-will-smith-flop/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/california-parks-stole-the-show-in-this-will-smith-flop/ In a little-explored corner of Humboldt Redwoods State Park, near where Robinson Creek empties into the Eel River, film set manager and scout Rowdy Kelley shows me where Jaden Smith was chased by killer baboons in the sci-fi blockbuster “After Earth”. The post-apocalyptic film – directed by M. Night Shyamalan and released in 2013 – […]]]>

In a little-explored corner of Humboldt Redwoods State Park, near where Robinson Creek empties into the Eel River, film set manager and scout Rowdy Kelley shows me where Jaden Smith was chased by killer baboons in the sci-fi blockbuster “After Earth”.

The post-apocalyptic film – directed by M. Night Shyamalan and released in 2013 – was said to be “the most painful failure” of Will Smith’s career. Critics and audiences hated it, but the scenes filmed in this park were unquestionably dazzling.

Several giant sequoias are spread across the pale green creek, resembling a huge set of pick-up sticks and surrounded by ferns and sorrel. Standing atop one of the trees above the creek, Kelley offers some choice behind-the-scenes details: how a “widowmaker” branch fell from high above and nearly crushed several crew members. How the director of the second unit had terrible poison ivy. How Jaden Smith’s body nearly went hypothermic.

Rowdy Kelley revisits the filming location where Jaden Smith was chased by killer baboons in ‘After Earth’.

Ashley Harrel

As the guy who scouts and manages locations, part of Kelley’s job is to prevent that from happening, along with all sorts of other responsibilities.

“Where am I going to put all the crew?” How are they going to get here? When they are there, where do they go to the bathroom? ” he says. “When you get into a team pushing 50 or 60 people walking around, it becomes a danger and a liability, so you have to know where they’re going to be and whether they’re going to be in the poison oak or not.”

Then, of course, there are financial considerations. Kelley likes to say that being a location scout means it takes “a director’s heart, a cinematographer’s eye, and a producer’s mind.” It’s important and rewarding work, he says, and yet nobody really comes to film school saying, “I want to be a stage manager.”

For Kelley, the road to becoming a scout was unusual. He spent the first part of his life in Humboldt County and was always an avid outdoorsman and, like his parents, a rodeo. After his parents separated and his mother moved to Dallas, he went with her, finished high school, and became a salesman for fine Italian suits. “I was a fashion freak in Dallas,” he says.

Rowdy Kelley has had many jobs: cowboy, stuntman, actor, Bigfooter, Italian costume salesman, house painter and scout and film director.

Rowdy Kelley has had many jobs: cowboy, stuntman, actor, Bigfooter, Italian costume salesman, house painter and scout and film director.

Ashley Harrel

He returned to California to attend film school at Humboldt State University and, once out of college, took on a series of jobs at News Channel 3, including senior control operator, ground cameraman, director technical live information and producer. When an opportunity to work as a production assistant on “The Majestic” with Jim Carrey presented itself, Kelley took it and never looked back.

Kirsten Dunst in the 2017 film "Woodshock," which was filmed at multiple locations in Humboldt County.

Kirsten Dunst in the 2017 film “Woodshock,” which was filmed in multiple locations in Humboldt County.

Image via A24 films

Since then, he has been scouting locations for Humboldt-based feature films, Imax films, music videos, promotional videos and commercials. He has worked on sets for more than a dozen projects, including “Woodshock” with Kirsten Dunst, “A Wrinkle in Time” with Reese Witherspoon and Oprah Winfrey and most recently, “The Sky Is Everywhere,” an Apple TV movie. More with Jason Segel and premieres February 11.

Although Kelley usually serves as a scout and manager, he occasionally takes on acting and even stunt roles. He sometimes paints houses. Oh, and he’s also worked on numerous television and film passion projects involving Bigfoot. “Being a Bigfooter, I never made any money,” he says. “Actually, it costs me a lot of money to be a Bigfooter.”

It’s a long way of saying, it’s pretty fun to drive around Humboldt County with Kelley to see the locations he’s picked to appear in the big movies.

When I first asked for a filming location tour, I was hoping it would take me to Fern Canyon, where “The Lost World: Jurassic Park” was filmed. He didn’t work on that one but was involved in Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life,” which starred Brad Pitt and Sean Penn and included scenes shot in Fern Canyon.

The area where old Route 101 once ran through Humboldt Redwoods State Park has more recently been used as a filming location.

The area where old Route 101 once ran through Humboldt Redwoods State Park has more recently been used as a filming location.

Ashley Harrel

Kelley didn’t want to go, however, because after “The Tree of Life”, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park officials stopped issuing permits for the location. Film projects had disrupted the park too much. Instead, Kelley wanted to show me where some of her favorite Humboldt Redwoods scenes took place.


The first stop is a scenic bridge covered in fallen yellow leaves in the northern part of the park, near old Highway 101. In the scene, a troubled weed dispensary employee played by Dunst does some soul-searching amidst the fog.

There was no actual fog, so the crew pumped in some. The wind blew it to the nearby highway, prompting someone to call a fire. “It was one of those things that I had to put on myself because I was the location manager,” Kelley says. “A die [Cal Fire] the captains arrived and bitched at us. They didn’t fine us or anything, but they made us feel bad.

The artistic and depressing film did not succeed. But Kelley enjoyed working with Dunst, who was very down to earth, he says. When she landed in Humboldt, it was Kelley who drove her to a dispensary so she could learn how to roll a joint for the role, he says.

Scout and filming location manager Rowdy Kelley stands in a backdrop used in "Woodshock" with Kirsten Dunst.

Scout and filming director Rowdy Kelley stands in a backdrop used in ‘Woodshock’ starring Kirsten Dunst.

Ashley Harrel

Kelley also took me to a large hollow redwood stump. Crew members built a platform inside to make it look fresh cut, and Dunst lay on top for a memorable scene. Then he showed me where Dunst was to be levitated in the air as part of the tallest stunt ever for a Hollywood movie in the redwoods, he says.

It was tricky, he says, because it required a 100-foot crane and lots of other equipment that is off limits for much of the year due to marbled murrelet and spotted owl nesting seasons. As it happens, filming fell between seasons and the park issued a permit.

In Humboldt Redwoods State Park, a 100ft crane levitated Kirsten Dunst in the film "Woodshock."

In Humboldt Redwoods State Park, a 100-foot crane levitated Kirsten Dunst in the movie “Woodshock.”

Rowdy Kelley

Next, Kelley led me down a particularly scenic route, perfect for directors looking for “tight redwoods.” “I don’t even know how many car commercials have been filmed here,” he says. “I was part of at least four of them.”

We end the tour by visiting the “After Earth” locations, and after watching the movie the night before, I recognize them all. The hog hole that Jaden Smith sleeps in while everything else freezes around him. The place where he passes out after an insect bite causes anaphylaxis. The redwood he stands on before taking a fateful leap and flying hundreds of feet away.

It’s all pretty magical, even if the movie didn’t quite land. I’m curious if Kelley wishes some of the movies he worked on were more successful, and I ask. Not necessarily, he says.

“The great thing about movies in Humboldt is that the redwoods are always the best part.”



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Man jailed for stealing succulents from California parks https://orland-ca.com/man-jailed-for-stealing-succulents-from-california-parks/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 01:41:59 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/man-jailed-for-stealing-succulents-from-california-parks/ A man was sentenced to two years in federal prison last week for attempting to export at least $150,000 worth of wild succulents he poached from native habitats in Northern California state parks, a said the United States Department of Justice. On October 11, 2018, Byungsu Kim, 46, and co-defendants Youngin Back, 47, and Bong […]]]>

A man was sentenced to two years in federal prison last week for attempting to export at least $150,000 worth of wild succulents he poached from native habitats in Northern California state parks, a said the United States Department of Justice.

On October 11, 2018, Byungsu Kim, 46, and co-defendants Youngin Back, 47, and Bong Jun Kim, 46, traveled by car from Los Angeles International Airport to Crescent City, California with plans to harvest wild plants and smuggle them into South Korea, the department said in a Jan. 20 statement. Throughout October 2018, they uprooted plants from the ground at DeMartin State Beach in Klamath, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park in Crescent City, and Russian Gulch State Park in Mendocino County. , says the department. The Dudleya plants – a type of succulent with a pretty rose shape that grows along coastal cliffs – were then brought to a nursery operated by Kim in Vista, a town near San Diego.

Because growing Dudleyas in nurseries takes years, smugglers have been known to harvest wild, live plants from the ground in Northern California and export them overseas where they are sold on the black market.


Byungsu Kim scheduled an inspection with a county agriculture official at the Vista nursery and “falsely told him that the government-issued certificate needed to export the plants should list 1,397 Dudleya plants for export to the South Korea and that the ‘place of origin’ of the factories was San Diego County,” the department said.

The thieves then transported the plants to a commercial exporter in Compton to smuggle their shipment into South Korea, but the effort was stopped by local law enforcement who obtained a search warrant and found 3,715 poached Dudleya plants in boxes labeled “rush” and “live plants,” the department said.

The department said internet search history on Kim’s phone – including an indication that he had read a press release about the arrest and conviction of three other Dudleya poachers – showed he knew. that the taking of the plants was illegal.

The three accused were arrested. California authorities confiscated Byungsu Kim’s South Korean passport after his arrest, but he later obtained a new passport in January 2019 “by falsely claiming to the South Korean consulate in Los Angeles that he had lost his passport”, the department said.

Byungsu Kim and Back reportedly fled to Mexico on foot in May 2019 through the Tijuana-San Ysidro border crossing after learning federal charges were pending against them. With his fraudulent passport, Kim flew with Back from Mexico to China, and eventually to South Korea, the department said.

Kim surfaced in South Africa in October 2019, where he was arrested for illegally collecting plants from protected areas for export to South Korea. After pleading guilty to the criminal charges in South Africa and spending a year in detention, he was extradited to the United States in October 2020, where he has since been held by the federal government.

Kim was sentenced on Jan. 20 by U.S. District Judge George H. Wu. He was ordered to pay $3,985 to the State of California to cover the cost of replanting stolen Dudleyas after his arrest, the report said. department. He pleaded guilty in September 2021 to one count of attempting to illegally export plants. Bong Jun Kim pleaded guilty in July 2019 to the same crime and spent four months in federal custody. Back remains a fugitive, the department said.

“[Byungsu Kim’s] the willful criminal conduct in October 2019 was not an isolated event: he had performed the same scheme multiple times in California,” prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memorandum, the department said. “[Kim] had traveled to the United States more than 50 times since 2009. Customs records show he traveled for succulent-related purposes and often with tens of thousands of dollars in cash (sometimes declared, sometimes not) and fake phytosanitary certificates .

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Man jailed for stealing succulents from California parks https://orland-ca.com/man-jailed-for-stealing-succulents-from-california-parks-2/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orland-ca.com/man-jailed-for-stealing-succulents-from-california-parks-2/ A man was sentenced to two years in federal prison last week for attempting to export at least $150,000 worth of wild succulents he poached from native habitats in Northern California state parks, a said the United States Department of Justice. On October 11, 2018, Byungsu Kim, 46, and co-defendants Youngin Back, 47, and Bong […]]]>

A man was sentenced to two years in federal prison last week for attempting to export at least $150,000 worth of wild succulents he poached from native habitats in Northern California state parks, a said the United States Department of Justice.

On October 11, 2018, Byungsu Kim, 46, and co-defendants Youngin Back, 47, and Bong Jun Kim, 46, traveled by car from Los Angeles International Airport to Crescent City, California with plans to harvest wild plants and smuggle them into South Korea, the department said in a Jan. 20 statement. Throughout October 2018, they uprooted plants from the ground at DeMartin State Beach in Klamath, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park in Crescent City, and Russian Gulch State Park in Mendocino County. , says the department. The Dudleya plants – a type of succulent with a pretty rose shape that grows along coastal cliffs – were then brought to a nursery operated by Kim in Vista, a town near San Diego.

Because growing Dudleyas in nurseries takes years, smugglers have been known to harvest wild, live plants from the ground in Northern California and export them overseas where they are sold on the black market.


Byungsu Kim scheduled an inspection with a county agriculture official at the Vista nursery and “falsely told him that the government-issued certificate needed to export the plants should list 1,397 Dudleya plants for export to the South Korea and that the ‘place of origin’ of the factories was San Diego County,” the department said.

The thieves then transported the plants to a commercial exporter in Compton to smuggle their shipment into South Korea, but the effort was stopped by local law enforcement who obtained a search warrant and found 3,715 poached Dudleya plants in boxes labeled “rush” and “live plants,” the department said.

The department said internet search history on Kim’s phone – including an indication that he had read a press release about the arrest and conviction of three other Dudleya poachers – showed he knew. that the taking of the plants was illegal.

The three accused were arrested. California authorities confiscated Byungsu Kim’s South Korean passport after his arrest, but he later obtained a new passport in January 2019 “by falsely claiming to the South Korean consulate in Los Angeles that he had lost his passport”, the department said.

Byungsu Kim and Back reportedly fled to Mexico on foot in May 2019 through the Tijuana-San Ysidro border crossing after learning federal charges were pending against them. With his fraudulent passport, Kim flew with Back from Mexico to China, and eventually to South Korea, the department said.

Kim surfaced in South Africa in October 2019, where he was arrested for illegally collecting plants from protected areas for export to South Korea. After pleading guilty to the criminal charges in South Africa and spending a year in detention, he was extradited to the United States in October 2020, where he has since been held by the federal government.

Kim was sentenced on Jan. 20 by U.S. District Judge George H. Wu. He was ordered to pay $3,985 to the State of California to cover the cost of replanting stolen Dudleyas after his arrest, the report said. department. He pleaded guilty in September 2021 to one count of attempting to illegally export plants. Bong Jun Kim pleaded guilty in July 2019 to the same crime and spent four months in federal custody. Back remains a fugitive, the department said.

“[Byungsu Kim’s] the willful criminal conduct in October 2019 was not an isolated event: he had performed the same scheme multiple times in California,” prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memorandum, the department said. “[Kim] had traveled to the United States more than 50 times since 2009. Customs records show he traveled for succulent-related purposes and often with tens of thousands of dollars in cash (sometimes declared, sometimes not) and fake phytosanitary certificates .

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